Topic: Society & Culture

IELTS Speaking: Talking about food

Questions related to food are quite popular with IELTS test-makers – probably because most people enjoy food and usually talk about it extensively in their day-to-day lives.

In my latest podcast, I’ll introduce you to some useful vocabulary to talk about food. Have a listen, make notes and then attempt the quiz on Schoology. Good luck!

 

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IELTS Speaking: Talking about family and friends

Here’s another SoundCloud podcast. This one has lots of great vocabulary to use when talking about your friends and family. Listen carefully and identify the collocations.

https://soundcloud.com/msielts/ielts-speaking-family-friends

Emotions (Anger) – Model answer

Here is a model answer for the Speaking part 3 question I gave you earlier.

  1. I think men and women value different things which can lead them to feel angry about different things. I think women are more likely to get angry about irresponsible behavior than men while men are more likely to lose their temper. However some issues could cause anger in the both of them such as violence.
  1. Anger is justified in many instances such as when we are on the receiving end of unreasonable behavior, when we are faced with crime, perhaps even small things such as someone being late without reason for a meeting. It depends on each individual what they perceive to be accepted standards of behavior and any deviation from it could reasonably evoke anger. Though simply because anger is justified should not be seen as a reason to act upon it and cause distress to others.
  1. An increase in your rate of heartbeat, trembling, sweating, clenching your jaws and grinding your teeth are physical symptoms of getting angry whereas mental symptoms include feelings of anxiety, stress in terms of more pressure and in some cases even sadness. Anger is universally known to be detrimental to both, physical and mental well-being.
  1. In my culture, people usually have verbal confrontations when they are angry. There is often yelling and swearing but very rarely does it lead to a physical altercation. However in the northern parts of my country, it is not uncommon to hear of people engaging in fights, especially in groups.

Is your answer similar in structure? Share your comments below.

IELTS Speaking Part 3: Pets

Here are some sample IELTS Speaking Part 3 questions relating to animals, specifically pets.

 

1. Do you think some people are too attached to their pets?

2. Why do some people not like pets?

3. Is it morally right to spend hundreds of dollars on pets?

4. Pets are considered to be a burden to most of the city dwellers. To what extent do you agree?

 

Read how to answer IELTS Speaking Part 3 questions. Write your answers in the comments below. I’ll give you a sample answer next week.

IELTS Speaking Part 3: Emotions (Anger)

Here are some sample IELTS Speaking Part 3 questions relating to emotions, specifically anger.

 

1. Do you think men and women feel angry about the same things?

2. When is anger justified?

3. What are the physical and mental effects of getting angry?

4. In your culture, how do people generally respond to anger?

 

Read how to answer IELTS Speaking Part 3 questions. Write your answers in the comments below. I’ll give you a sample answer next week.

IELTS Speaking Part 3: Culture and politeness

Here are some sample IELTS Speaking Part 3 questions about society and culture .

 

Lets talk about your culture.

1. How important is it to be polite in your culture?
2. How do you show politeness in your culture?
3. What are some behaviours that are considered impolite in your culture?
4. Do you think we are more polite with strangers than people we know?

 

Read how to answer IELTS Speaking Part 3 questions. Write your answers in the comments below. I’ll give you a sample answer next week.

IELTS SPEAKING PART 2 – Q.15 MODEL ANSWER

Here’s the answer for last week’s Speaking Part 2 question.

I am going to talk about Hindustani and Carnatic music. They’re the traditional forms of music in India.

Hindustani music is prevalent in the northern part of the country while Carnatic is associated uniquely with the southern states. They’re both based on ragas, but the style differs according to the “gharanas” that one trains in. There are also many instruments such as the sitar, the tabla, the harmonium, etc., that are integral to these forms of music.

Neither form of music is widely popular, however, fusions with Western music are becoming increasingly popular. Most commercial singers are trained in classical Indian music to some extent.

Personally, I enjoy both forms of music. Although, I prefer instrumental performances as I have never been trained in classical music and so feel that I cannot appreciate the nuances of a vocal performance.

In case you missed it, here’s last week’s question.

Q1

Learn more about how to answer questions in Speaking part 2 and manage time efficiently.